Why Don’t Women Want To Talk About Menopause?

life after 50, baby boomer women, boomer wellness

When I read about the AARP Menopause Survey in last month’s AARP THE MAGAZINEI was surprised to find out that 42% of the more than 400 women between the ages 50 and 59 who participated in the survey, say they’ve never discussed menopause with a health provider.

Really ladies? Why don’t women want to talk about menopause?

The same survey also reported that 84% of women say their symptoms interfere with their lives, with 12% who say they interfere “a great deal” or are debilitating. The most common symptoms of menopause for women: 50% hot flashes (thankfully, haven’t had too many of those); 42% night sweats (yep, still getting those flashes even at 60); 38% vaginal dryness (check, check, check – count me in this percentage).

There we go. Now we’re talking about menopause!

AARP Menopause Survey

*AARP surveyed more than 400 women between ages 50 and 59 to ask about their experiences with, and attitudes toward, menopause.

An Interview with Dr. Charlotte Yeh
Recently, I had a chance to talk about menopause with Charlotte Yeh, MD FACEP, who is the Chief Medical Officer for AARP Services, Inc. Dr. Yeh has more than 30 years of health care experience. She is an expert in health care delivery in the areas of quality, safety, and efficiency. I asked Dr. Yeh some basic questions that I thought might be useful to women for whom menopause is a new experience. (However, even those of us like me who are post-menopausal may find Dr. Yeh’s guidance reassuring.) Continue reading

My Post 50 Yoga Journey: Time To Celebrate Accomplishments

life after 50, baby boomer women, boomer wellness“How do you feel?” asked my teacher B after I concluded my final one hour practice teach to become a yoga instructor. I was overwhelmed with gratitude for all that I had accomplished during the past 16 months of YTT200 training at Lourdes Institute of Wholistic Studies in Camden, NJ.

There was a bond among the five of us who went through the journey together. We were forever changed in mind, body, and spirit. During our closing ceremonies we surrounded each other in a circle with a special blessing and chant of “om”. We were encouraged to observe and give positive feedback after each practice teach. “Leave the teacher open to new possibilities, alternatives, and choices rather than the idea that there is a right or wrong way,” B said.

As new teachers, we each created an affirmation about ourselves and our teaching. “I, Judi, am grateful for having completed my YTT 200 teacher training and look forward to sharing the benefits of yoga with others,” I chanted the sentence three times and then my classmates and teachers repeated it in unison to reconfirm.

yoga; yoga teacher training, Lourdes Institute of Wholistic Studies, meditation

As new yoga teachers, we each created an affirmation.

Becoming A Teacher, But Always A Student
Gerald Marzorati, a former editor of The New York Times Magazine, wrote an essay last month called “Practicing for a Better Old Age.” In his writing Gerald recommends that during your life after 50 that you “Find something — something new, something difficult — to immerse yourself in and improve at.” He says that “What brings us to the the beauty of a disciplined effort at improvement and, I think, the only guaranteed benefit of finding something, as I found in tennis, to learn and commit to: You see time and make it yours. You counter the narrative of diminishment and loss with one of progress and bettering.” Continue reading